Archive for the ‘Medicine’ Category

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The “worldwide AIDS epidemic” is largely a fictional construct created by the pharmaceutical industry. AIDS front groups want to keep spreading fear in order to unlock more fundraising dollars which of course boosts the profits of pharmaceutical and prescription drug companies.

The mainstream media isn’t asking the tough questions anymore… it has already surrendered its soul to Big Business. There’s no room for independent thinkers in our global corporate propaganda machine, and those who attempt to ask reasonable questions will always be condemned for stepping out of line and daring to challenge the status quo. You’re either “on board” with their current AIDS vaccine mythology, or you’re ostracized and shunned by the whole crowd.

Deep down inside you knew that we are all controlled by fear. By our governments and the corporations, they all want us scared because a scared public is easier to control, keep that in mind next time your watching the God box.

You should also take a look at the documentary named “Origins of Aids” and get educated in how the virus came to be.

WOG out.

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From the article:

Sea turtles, pigeons and honeybees are among the animals that have an incredibly useful skill we don’t possess – they can sense the Earth’s magnetic fields with their bodies. But perhaps our magnetovision is just latent – when a light-sensitive protein was transferred from humans to fruit flies, the insects adopted the protein for their own magnetovision.

Steven Reppert of the University of Massachusetts in Worcester and his colleagues study cryptochromes – light-sensitive proteins that regulate the circadian clocks of many creatures. Reppert knew that cryptochromes also help fruit flies and birds sense the Earth’s magnetic fields, and he wanted to see whether human cryptochromes could do the same thing. To find out Reppert replaced those found in fruit flies with a human version, hCRY2, which is found in the retina.

The mutant flies were trained to associate a sugar reward with a magnetic field. When given the option to fly down either a magnetised or non-magnetised arm of a maze they opted for the magnetised one. Flies genetically engineered to lack cryptochrome altogether were indifferent to the magnetic field in one arm and were evenly distributed down both arms of the maze.

This is pretty interesting but fruit flies aren’t humans so we’ll just have to wait and see if it’s going to work on us. It would probably be pretty handy skill to have, it would be harder to get lost if humans had magnetovision.

Original site.

WOG out.

From the article:

The hallucinogen in magic mushrooms may no longer just be for hippies seeking a trippy high.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have been studying the effects of psilocybin, a chemical found in some psychedelic mushrooms, that’s credited with inducing transcendental states. Now, they say, they’ve zeroed in on the perfect dosage level to produce transformative mystical and spiritual experiences that offer long-lasting life-changing benefits, while carrying little risk of negative reactions.

The breakthrough could speed the day when doctors use psilocybin–long viewed skeptically for its association with 1960s countercultural thrill-seekers–for a range of valuable clinical functions, like easing the anxiety of terminally ill patients, treating depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, and helping smokers quit. Already, studies in which depressed cancer patients were given the drug have reported positive results. “I’m not afraid to die anymore” one participant told The Lookout.

The Johns Hopkins study–whose results will be published this week in the journal Psychopharmacology–involved giving healthy volunteers varying doses of psilocybin in a controlled and supportive setting, over four separate sessions. Looking back more than a year later, 94 percent of participants rated it as one of the top five most spiritually significant experiences of their lifetimes.

More important, 89 percent reported lasting, positive changes in their behavior–better relationships with others, for instance, or increased care for their own mental and physical well-being. Those assessments were corroborated by family members and others.

“I think my heart is more open to all interactions with other people,” one volunteer reported in a questionnaire given to participants 14-months after their session.

“I feel that I relate better in my marriage,” wrote another. “There is more empathy — a greater understanding of people, and understanding their difficulties, and less judgment.”

Identifying the exact right dosage for hallucinogenic drugs is crucial, Roland Griffiths, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins who led the study, explained to The Lookout. That’s because a “bad trip” can trigger hazardous, self-destructive behavior, but low doses don’t produce the kind of transformative experiences that can offer long-term benefits. By trying a range of doses, Griffiths said, researchers were able to find the sweet spot, “where a high or intermediate dose can produce, fairly reliably, these mystical experiences, with very low probability of a significant fear reaction.”

I really don’t get why this is illegal, it should be taxed and regulated like alcohol and the government should help with the doses so that people can have a pleasant experience without the risk of a bad trip.

Maybe this is what is needed to combat the human strife we have today?

I’ll stop now, I’m sounding like a damn hippy.

Original site.

WOG out.

From the article:

Scientists have for the first time created laser light using living biological material: a single human cell and some jellyfish protein.

“Lasers started from physics and are viewed as engineering devices,” says Seok-Hyun Yun, an optical physicist at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, who created the ‘living laser’ with his colleague Malte Gather. “This is the first time that we have used biological materials to build a laser and generate light from something that is living.” The finding is reported today in Nature Photonics.

Building a laser requires two things: a lasing material that amplifies light from an external source (a ‘gain medium’) and an arrangement of mirrors (an ‘optical cavity’), which concentrates and aligns the light waves into a tight beam. Until now, the gain medium has only been made from non-biological substances such as doped crystals, semiconductors or gases, but in this case the researchers used enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) — the substance that makes jellyfish bioluminescent, which is used extensively in cell biology to label cells.

The team engineered human embryonic kidney cells to produce GFP, then placed a single cell between two mirrors to make an optical cavity just 20 micrometres across. When they fed the cell pulses of blue light, it emitted a directional laser beam visible with the naked eye — and the cell wasn’t harmed.

The width of the laser beam is “tiny” and “fairly weak” in its brightness compared to traditional lasers, says Yun, but “an order of magnitude” brighter than natural jellyfish fluorescence, with a “beautiful green” colour.

Am I the only one that immediately thinks Scott Summers a.k.a. Cyclops here.

I read a lot of news to make this blog and I get the feeling that technology truly is accelerating at en exponential rate and we will end up at the singularity before you know it.

It’s an interesting time to be alive.

Original site.

WOG out

From the article:

It looks like the gillyweed from the Harry Potter films could one day be a reality.

Scientists have discovered a way for humans to potentially breathe underwater by merging our DNA with that of algae.

In research on salamanders they found that oxygen-producing algae have bonded with their eggs so closely that the two are now inseparable.

By studying the mechanism further, they hope that the same process could be applied to humans one day too.

This would allow us to swim without coming up for air like Harry does in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

In the film the slimy plant gives Harry gills on the side of his neck and lets him breathe underwater like a fish.

The real-life version however could work on a more fundamental level and change our DNA so that we are more like algae, which actually give off oxygen even though they are on the sea bed.

Researchers from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, found that human DNA is packed with hundreds of viruses we have absorbed since mankind came to be.

They applied this theory to salamanders because algae often got stuck in their embryos – and found that some salamanders are literally part algae.

The algae does not leave as the salamander grows, meaning that by the time they are fully formed adults, salamanders are part plant.

The discovery is the first documented case of a plant living in partnership, or symbiosis, with a vertebrate.

This is totally nuts but it might be a way we can evolve into something better then human, with this we could live underwater and build cities there. Or it could be used to colonize a planet with mostly water on the surface.

In the future we might not remain human on the outside but on the inside is up to you to decide if your human or not.

Original site.

WOG out.

From the article:

A pill to enhance moral behaviour, a treatment for racist thoughts, a therapy to increase your empathy for people in other countries – these may sound like the stuff of science fiction but with medicine getting closer to altering our moral state, society should be preparing for the consequences, according to a book that reviews scientific developments in the field.

Drugs such as Prozac that alter a patient’s mental state already have an impact on moral behaviour, but scientists predict that future medical advances may allow much more sophisticated manipulations.

The field is in its infancy, but “it’s very far from being science fiction”, said Dr Guy Kahane, deputy director of the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics and a Wellcome Trust biomedical ethics award winner.

“Science has ignored the question of moral improvement so far, but it is now becoming a big debate,” he said. “There is already a growing body of research you can describe in these terms. Studies show that certain drugs affect the ways people respond to moral dilemmas by increasing their sense of empathy, group affiliation and by reducing aggression.”

Researchers have become very interested in developing biomedical technologies capable of intervening in the biological processes that affect moral behaviour and moral thinking, according to Dr Tom Douglas, a Wellcome Trust research fellow at Oxford University’s Uehiro Centre. “It is a very hot area of scientific study right now.”

He is co-author of Enhancing Human Capacities, published on Monday, which includes a chapter on moral enhancement.

Drugs that affect our moral thinking and behaviour already exist, but we tend not to think of them in that way. [Prozac] lowers aggression and bitterness against environment and so could be said to make people more agreeable. Or Oxytocin, the so-called love hormone … increases feelings of social bonding and empathy while reducing anxiety,” he said.

“Scientists will develop more of these drugs and create new ways of taking drugs we already know about. We can already, for example, take prescribed doses of Oxytocin as a nasal spray,” he said.

Is it just me or does this feel like a really bad idea, this feels way to much like prozium to me and nothing should feel or sound like prozium.

There is a million ways this could be used to force people, that don’t fit the framework of what is considered “normal” by the establishment, people that might become the new Albert Einstein or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart if left alone to do what they want.

Original site.

WOG out.

From the article:

Canadian researchers find a simple cure for cancer, but major pharmaceutical companies are not interested.

Researchers at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, Canada have cured cancer last week, yet there is a little ripple in the news or in TV. It is a simple technique using very basic drug. The method employs dichloroacetate, which is currently used to treat metabolic disorders. So, there is no concern of side effects or about their long term effects.

This drug doesn’t require a patent, so anyone can employ it widely and cheaply compared to the costly cancer drugs produced by major pharmaceutical companies.

Canadian scientists tested this dichloroacetate (DCA) on human’s cells; it killed lung, breast and brain cancer cells and left the healthy cells alone. It was tested on Rats inflicted with severe tumors; their cells shrank when they were fed with water supplemented with DCA. The drug is widely available and the technique is easy to use, why the major drug companies are not involved? Or the Media interested in this find?

In human bodies there is a natural cancer fighting human cell, the mitochondria, but they need to be triggered to be effective. Scientists used to think that these mitochondria cells were damaged and thus ineffective against cancer. So they used to focus on glycolysis, which is less effective in curing cancer and more wasteful. The drug manufacturers focused on this glycolysis method to fight cancer. This DCA on the other hand doesn’t rely on glycolysis instead on mitochondria; it triggers the mitochondria which in turn fights the cancer cells.

As we all know there is no money in a cure, there is only money in treatment.

I hope this gets out on the market with a dirt cheap price tag, so we can save some damn people already.

Original site.

WOG out.